March 2019

Q1

What would be your beer if you could only drink one for the rest of your life?

 A1

Either Fairweather’s High Grade or Sawdust City’s Lone Pine. Two of my favourite IPAS from two of my favourite breweries.

 Q2 

Why did it take so long to make a sour?

 A2

It’s not personally my favourite style of beer. Despite having spent a few years seeking out as many as i could over the last few years to hopefully gain a better understanding of process and flavour profile. I often find besides my bias that sour beers tend to be very good or very bad… very few fall in the middle. This made the task slightly more intimidating. With some help and insight from peers and constant pressure from customers we decided to release our first which was “Peer Pressure” and we were pretty happy with the results and feedback. So while we will never be a sour focused brewery, make sure to keep an eye out for the odd tart and tangy release and make sure you act fast when we do!!!!

 

 Q3

What makes a New England IPA different ?

 A3

A few signatures of the style include a heavily chloride water profile that accentuates malt character and softens bitterness. A fruity characterful yeast strain that compliments hop varieties that are largely citrusy stone fruit and tropical characteristics. Huge hop aromas with subdued bitterness. High protein grist additions (i.e. oats, wheat, rye, and spelt) for mouth feel and texture. Heavy handed cold side dry hopping (sometimes during active fermentation) and low temperature whirlpool additions contribute massive aromas with little bitterness. The combination of the high protein grist and heavy late hopping form the characteristic haze.

 

Q4

Why should we store beer up right?

 A4

Storing upright allows any yeast or particulate to settle properly to the bottom and allows the liquid to be decanted of such sediment. Also by staying upright the CO2 blanket formed in the neck of the bottle or head space of the can should help protect or at least slow the rate at which it is exposed to oxygen. Oxygen and light are enemies of beer and oxidized beer can create a number of off flavours predominantly a cardboard/ papery characteristic that is undesirable in the majority if not all beer styles.

 

Q5

What is your favorite hop currently?

 A5

Eukanot and Wai-iti have been going really well for me lately. I really love the full orchard and stone fruit character from Eukanot with that nice diesel petrol character reminiscent of southern hemisphere Riesling. Wai-iti also has flavours akin to white wine with a really dominant lime zest note. Despite being someone who has always leaned to using local ingredients when the option is there, pretty much anything coming from New Zealand right now I'm excited to work with. The tropical characteristics stone fruit and wine notes are totally what my pallet seems to want these days in hop forward brews.

February 2019

Q1

Are there any plans for the members club in the future?

A1

A nod's as good as a wink to a blind bat, eh? Nudge, nudge. Know what I mean?

Q2 

Are you going to make more sour beers?

A2

Yes! You can look for us to make more sour beers this year. While we don't plan on making them an absolute staple, you can expect at least a quarterly sour beer concept. We also hope that as our barrel program grows you will probably see a further addition of unique tart and sour farmhouse style beers that will hopefully help round our offerings!

Q3 

May I have all your beer recipes?

A3

I cant say on here yes (my boss might get mad) but I love talking beer and brewing and have been known to give out a lot of secrets / recipes and processes across the bar over a beer…showing up with a few cool beers never hurts your chances either.

Q4 

How long do you age your beers?

A4

Typically 14- 21 days for most of our beers. We have released beers that have been aged in barrels for any where between 2 - 16 months! Those beers tend to tell you when they are ready rather than trying to keep them on a schedule.

Q5

How difficult is it to collaborate with other breweries?

A5

Scheduling, scheduling, scheduling. Believe it or not brewers tend to be busy people with a lot on their plate at any given time. Finding gaps in each others schedules that simultaneously align seems to be the toughest part. From there it's just coming up with an idea which tends to happen pretty organically and is by far the funnest part. You'd be surprised at how many concepts most brewers have on the back burner. Often it's the product of the combined creativity of yourself and other industry friends.